Make Your Next Move

Whether you’re in high school or in college, taking steps now can help you be a successful law school applicant.

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High School Student

Talk to your career counselor.

A career counselor can recommend courses for you to take next semester and help you choose the right undergraduate school and major. Your undergraduate education will have an impact on your law school opportunities.
Select challenging classes.

Choose courses that will enhance your reading comprehension, writing, and analytical skills. By challenging yourself in high school, you will be better prepared to do well as an undergraduate, and therefore be more likely to succeed in law school.
Keep up your GPA.

It’s not the only factor that schools consider when accepting applicants, but it matters.
Attend a DiscoverLaw.org event.

Law schools all around the United States and Canada host DiscoverLaw.org events where you can learn about law school and law careers. Additionally, you’ll meet working lawyers, law students, and law school faculty. Visit Upcoming Events to see if a DiscoverLaw.org event is being hosted in your area.
Explore your many career options.

Conduct online research about careers. Talk to law students and lawyers about their experiences. Find a mentor and take advantage of opportunities to volunteer, shadow, or intern with people working in the legal profession. Not sure which field of law is right for you? Take DiscoverLaw.org’s quiz for ideas.

First-Year Undergraduate

Talk to your prelaw advisor.

An advisor can recommend courses for you to take next semester, provide guidance on the LSAT, and help you choose the right law school for you.
Select challenging classes.

Choose courses that will enhance your reading comprehension, writing, and analytical skills. By challenging yourself as an undergraduate, you will be better positioned to do well on the LSAT and in law school.
Keep up your GPA.

It’s not the only factor that law schools consider when accepting applicants, but it matters.
Join a prelaw organization on campus.

Many undergraduate campuses have prelaw student groups. They help you learn how you can become a competitive law school applicant. They also connect you to up-to-date news and resources on your campus and in your area. No prelaw group at your school? Start one yourself!
Attend a DiscoverLaw.org event.

Law schools all around the United States and Canada host DiscoverLaw.org events where you can learn about law school and law careers. Additionally, you’ll meet working lawyers, law students, and law school faculty. Visit Upcoming Events to see if a DiscoverLaw.org event is being hosted in your area.
Explore your many career options.

Conduct online research about careers. Talk to law students and lawyers about their experiences. Find a mentor and take advantage of opportunities to volunteer, shadow, or intern with people working in the legal profession. Not sure which field of law is right for you? Take DiscoverLaw.org’s quiz for ideas.

Second-Year Undergraduate

Talk to your prelaw advisor.

An advisor can recommend courses for you to take next semester, provide guidance on the LSAT, and help you choose the right law school for you.
Select challenging classes.

Choose courses that will enhance your reading comprehension, writing, and analytical skills. By challenging yourself as an undergraduate, you will be better positioned to do well on the LSAT and in law school.
Keep up your GPA.

It’s not the only factor that law schools consider when accepting applicants, but it matters.
Join a prelaw organization on campus.

Many undergraduate campuses have prelaw student groups. They help you learn how you can become a competitive law school applicant. They also connect you to up-to-date news and resources on your campus and in your area. No prelaw group at your school? Start one yourself!
Attend a DiscoverLaw.org event.

Law schools all around the United States and Canada host DiscoverLaw.org events where you can learn about law school and law careers. Additionally, you’ll meet working lawyers, law students, and law school faculty. Visit Upcoming Events to see if a DiscoverLaw.org event is being hosted in your area.
Attend an LSAC Law School Forum.

Law School Forums
are held every year in cities throughout the country. These events allow you to meet reps of more than 150 law schools in one place and to attend workshops on the LSAT, the admission process, financing law school, and the importance of diversity to law schools.
Visit a law school.

Call the admission office and ask for a tour. Visit the school’s website, sit in on a class, and talk to alumni.

For more information about law schools, see the LSAC Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools.
Explore your many career options.

Conduct online research about careers. Talk to law students and lawyers about their experiences. Find a mentor and take advantage of opportunities to volunteer, shadow, or intern with people working in the legal profession. Not sure which field of law is right for you? Take DiscoverLaw.org’s quiz for ideas.

Third-Year Undergraduate

Talk to your prelaw advisor.

An advisor can recommend courses for you to take next semester, provide guidance on the LSAT, and help you choose the right law school for you.
Select challenging classes.

Choose courses that will enhance your reading comprehension, writing, and analytical skills. By challenging yourself as an undergraduate, you will be better positioned to do well on the LSAT and in law school.
Keep up your GPA.

It’s not the only factor that law schools consider when accepting applicants, but it matters.
Join a prelaw organization on campus.

Many undergraduate campuses have prelaw student groups. They help you learn how you can become a competitive law school applicant. They also connect you to up-to-date news and resources on your campus and in your area. No prelaw group at your school? Start one yourself!
Attend an LSAC Law School Forum.

Law School Forums
are held every year in cities throughout the country. These events allow you to meet reps of more than 150 law schools in one place and to attend workshops on the LSAT, the admission process, financing law school, and the importance of diversity to law schools.
Visit a law school.

Call the admission office and ask for a tour. Visit the school’s website, sit in on a class, and talk to alumni.

For more information about law schools, see the LSAC Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools.
Explore your many career options.

Conduct online research about careers. Talk to law students and lawyers about their experiences. Find a mentor and take advantage of opportunities to volunteer, shadow, or intern with people working in the legal profession. Not sure which field of law is right for you? Take DiscoverLaw.org’s quiz for ideas.

Fourth-Year Undergraduate, or beyond ...

Talk to your prelaw advisor.

An advisor can provide guidance on the LSAT and help you choose the right law school for you. If you’ve already graduated, you can locate your prelaw advisor by contacting your undergraduate degree-granting school, or by establishing an account with LSAC, which will provide your advisor’s name and contact information.
Join a prelaw organization on campus.

Many undergraduate campuses have prelaw student groups. They help you learn how you can become a competitive law school applicant. They also connect you to up-to-date news and resources on your campus and in your area. No prelaw group at your school? Start one yourself!
Attend an LSAC Law School Forum.

Law School Forums
are held every year in cities throughout the country. These events allow you to meet reps of more than 150 law schools in one place and to attend workshops on the LSAT, the admission process, financing law school, and the importance of diversity to law schools.
Visit a law school.

Call the admission office and ask for a tour. Visit the school’s website, sit in on a class, and talk to alumni.

For more information about law schools, see the LSAC Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools.
Explore your many career options.

Conduct online research about careers. Talk to law students and lawyers about their experiences. Find a mentor and take advantage of opportunities to volunteer, shadow, or intern with people working in the legal profession. Not sure which field of law is right for you? Take DiscoverLaw.org’s quiz for ideas.

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DiscoverLaw.org PLUS Programs

First- and second-year college students: Get the skills you need to succeed in law school by attending a four-week summer prelaw program. There’s no cost to attend, and participants receive a small stipend.

Learn More

Upcoming Events

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